Bobby Broom Celebrates the Jazz Piano Greats With “Keyed Up,” Set for September 23 Release By Steele Records

Album Features Nine Compositions
By or For Iconic Pianists,
With Piano Player Justin Dillard Augmenting Broom’s Longtime Trio with
Bassist Dennis Carroll & Drummer Kobie Watkins
CD Release Show: Studio5 Performing Arts Center, Evanston, IL
Saturday, October 22

Master jazz guitarist Bobby Broom casts his ear on the masters of another instrument—the piano—with the September 23 release of Keyed Up (Steele Records). An exploration of compositions by (or associated with) great jazz pianists, the album is also Broom’s first in almost 30 years to itself feature an acoustic piano player. Justin Dillard, a youngish, fast-rising keyboardist from Broom’s home base of Chicago, joins his working trio with bassist Dennis Carroll and drummer Kobie Watkins.

 

In fact, it was an encounter with Dillard at a Chicago jam session that inspired Broom to realize the project (an idea he had long been nurturing). “I heard something intriguing in Justin that made me want to work with him,” he says. “It was a bit risky because I hadn’t played with him in such an intimate and crucial setting before we made this record. But it didn’t take long for me to know I had made the right choice.”

 

It doesn’t take the listener long, either. Dillard’s incandescent playing is a highlight of the very first track, Bud Powell’s “Hallucinations (Budo),” and maintains that high level throughout the album. From the blues-laden lines of James Williams’s “Soulful Bill” and McCoy Tyner’s “Blues on the Corner” to the exquisite tenderness of Erroll Garner’s “Misty,” Dillard earns his place in the spotlight. He also switches to his “laptop Swurlitzer,” an electronic keyboard, in a nod to fusioneers Chick Corea (“Humpty Dumpty”) and Herbie Hancock (“Driftin’”).

 

He’s not alone, of course. Carroll and Watkins are superlative as always, offering both sensitive support and lightning in a bottle that culminates in a spirited exchange of twelves, eights, and fours on “Blues on the Corner.” As for Broom, his excellence is understood—but he outdoes himself with his brilliant work on “Driftin’,” “Hallucinations (Budo),” and Horace Silver’s “Quicksilver.”

 

It’s the joining of these forces, however, that lets magic happen on Keyed Up. “When we make music, we’re never exactly sure how it’s going to turn out. It’s never a matter of ‘we’re just gonna play these tunes,’” Broom says. “In addition to the arrangements and preparation, there’s a great degree of intrigue and mystery in what we do. But we have developed such trust in each other, there’s never any doubt that the end result is going to be good.”

 

Bobby Broom was born on January 18, 1961, in New York City. When he was ten years old, he heard one of his father’s records—by organist Charles Earland—touching off his lifelong love affair with jazz. By the time he was sixteen, Broom was attending New York’s prestigious High School of Music and Art and gigging with pianist Al Haig; by the age of twenty-one, equipped with a freshman year of study at Berklee College of Music, and some already extraordinary pedigree, he began touring with Sonny Rollins.

 

By that time, Broom had also signed with GRP Records and recorded 1981’s Clean Sweep, which was a crossover jazz success. But rather than settle into a comfortable career in the emerging genre of “smooth jazz,” Broom took the road less traveled: He left the New York scene behind and established himself in Chicago.

 

In the 1990s Broom formed the first edition of his bass and drums trio, while also beginning to work with the members of what would eventually become the Deep Blue Organ Trio. During that decade he recorded a couple of quartet records before deciding to make a guitar-bass-drums trio his primary outlet. In 2000, a breakthrough year, he released the statement-making Modern Man (with organist Dr. Lonnie Smith, drummer Idris Muhammad, and Ronnie Cuber on bari sax), as well as the first of what would be many guitar-trio recordings, Stand!. He solidified a trio lineup with bassist Dennis Carroll and drummer Kobie Watkins with 2006’s Song and Dance (although Makaya McCraven filled in for the latter on 2014’s My Shining Hour). After establishing a new organ ensemble (the Organ-isation) with 2018’s Soul Fingers, Broom has returned to his longtime trio, but with the notion of supplementing it with pianist Justin Dillard for Keyed Up.

 

The use of a guitar-and-piano frontline remains somewhat novel in the jazz world, but Broom says overcoming that novelty is just a matter of seasoning. “When I first met Justin, he expressed some misgivings about operating with guitar,” he recalls. “I said to him, just listen and play. And he got better and better playing with me.” Lucky for us that we get to hear the results.

 

Bobby Broom and his quartet will perform a CD release show on Sat. 10/22 at Studio5 Performing Arts Center, 1938 Dempster Street, Evanston, IL. Broom is also appearing at the first annual Fretboard Summit (hosted by Fretboard Journal magazine), taking place at the Old Towne School of Folk Music’s Myron R. Szold Music Hall, Chicago, on Sat. 8/27; and at Western Michigan University’s “Jazz at The Crawlspace 2022” series at the Crawlspace Theater, Kalamazoo, MI, on Thurs. 9/8.

 

Photography: Todd Winters
 

 

[NOTEWORTHY]… With “Dedications” pianist, Alan Pasqua accomplishes the challenging task of leaving his unique and masterful imprint on this homage to the giants of the tradition.

Thoroughly satisfying and enjoyable. . . .From bop to swing, Alan Pasqua & Co. (in trio, quartet, and quintet settings) joyously explore many facets of the jazz tradition, adding zest and their own voices to every one of Alan’s excellent compositions. — The Music Advocate, May 1996

Pianist Alan Pasqua has dedicated his second Postcards CD to the incredibly rich tradition of jazz. On Dedications, his compositions cover the whole stylistic spectrum from swing and bebop through today’s polytonality and modality and are heard in the trio, quartet, and quintet settings. Building from a core trio featuring Dave Holland and Paul Motian (who have rarely recorded together) on four tunes, Pasqua adds Michael Brecker (on seldom-heard soprano saxophone) on one tune, and then creates two different quintets, one with both Michael and Randy Brecker, and one with Randy Brecker and Gary Bartz. From the lush, ducal “Ellingtonia” through the ethereal modality of “San Michele,” Alan Pasqua accomplishes the challenging task of leaving his unique and masterful imprint on this homage to the giants of the tradition. “Dedications,” says Pasqua, turning to his 1996 CD, “is my way of paying tribute to the positive influences on my life. Art, music, spirituality, family . . . I draw upon all of these whenever I’m playing or composing.

I wanted to take tradition and put my own stamp on it,” he continues, describing how he approached the compositions. “I found myself going back to my roots in jazz, back to an earlier perspective on jazz, to the styles I grew up with musically, and then reshaping the traditions, embellishing them — finding my own voice, making a more modern statement. It was like taking one step backward to take two steps forward.” ~Editorial Review | Amazon

Original Release Date:  October 21, 2006

At your leisure, spin “DEDICATIONS” by Alan Pasqua

Carnegie Hall Announces Schedule for NYO Jazz’s First US Tour Following June 24 Release of Debut Album We’re Still Here Led by Artistic Director and Bandleader/Trumpeter Sean Jones

US Tour Kicks Off at Carnegie Hall in
New York City on July 28 Featuring
GRAMMY® Award-nominated Vocalist
Jazzmeia Horn as Special Guest
US Tour Dates Include:
July 28 | Carnegie Hall | New York, NY
July 30 | Tri-C Metro Auditorium | Cleveland, OH
August 1 | Chautauqua Amphitheater | Chautauqua, NY
August 2 | The August Wilson African American Cultural Center | Pittsburgh, PA
August 4 | Navy Pier, Lake Stage in Polk Bros Park | Chicago, IL
August 5 | The Max M. and Marjorie S. Fisher Music Center | Detroit, MI
August 7 | Wisconsin Union Theater | Madison, WI
August 9 | John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts | Washington, D.C.

Carnegie Hall today announced the schedule for the first-ever US tour by its acclaimed NYO Jazz set to take place on the heels of the June 24, 2022 release of the ensemble’s first full-length studio album, We’re Still Here. The album features NYO Jazz Artistic Director and Bandleader/trumpeter Sean Jones and special guest Melissa Aldana on tenor saxophone, plus an appearance by trombonist Wycliffe Gordon. Available for pre-order, the album will be released by Platoon and will be available for digital download and on all streaming platforms in standard and Dolby Atmos Spatial Audio formats.

Following NYO Jazz’s US tour kick-off concert at Carnegie Hall on Thursday, July 28, the ensemble—joined by this summer’s special guest vocalist Jazzmeia Horn—will tour seven US cities under the direction of Sean Jones. The tour stops include Cleveland, OH on July 30 (Tri-C Metro Auditorium); Chautauqua, NY on August 1 (Chautauqua Amphitheater); Pittsburgh, PA on August 2 (The August Wilson African American Cultural Center); Chicago, IL on August 4 (Navy Pier, Lake Stage in Polk Bros Park); Detroit, MI on August 5 (The Max M. and Marjorie S. Fisher Music Center); Madison, WI on August 7 (Wisconsin Union Theater); and Washington, D.C. on August 9 (The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts).

“I’m very excited to perform with the amazing young musicians of Carnegie Hall’s NYO Jazz this summer,” said Jazzmeia Horn. “What a wonderful opportunity as this tour marks my first time playing an entire tour with a big band and I’m especially thrilled to sing selections from my new big band album, Dear Love. I’m curious to see how NYO Jazz will interpret my latest expression of love musically as we connect with audiences in cities around the US. This will be a fun journey to share with them!”

One of Carnegie Hall’s three acclaimed national youth ensembles, NYO Jazz—comprising outstanding young musicians ages 16–19 from across the United States—showcases the legacy and bright future of American jazz. Created in 2018 by the Hall’s Weill Music Institute, NYO Jazz annually brings together some of the nation’s finest teen jazz musicians to train, perform, and tour with world-class jazz masters while also serving as music ambassadors for their country. NYO Jazz’s successful international tours have included a 2018 inaugural European tour with Dianne Reeves as a special guest, and the ensemble’s debut tour to Asia in 2019 with Kurt Elling as a special guest. Although NYO Jazz was unable to travel during the past two years, the musicians convened virtually during the summer of 2020 and at Purchase College, State University of New York (SUNY) just north of New York City, in summer 2021, rehearsing and recording a wide range of repertoire, including its debut album.

We’re Still Here features four new works written for the band since its inception, a range of classic and contemporary charts that are hallmarks of its live concerts, and works exploring themes that include social justice, resilience, and the power of music to spark joy. The four Carnegie Hall-commissioned works on the album are: “Run with Jones” by Miguel Zenón, featuring Melissa Aldana as soloist; “Mr. Jones and Co.” by Ayn Inserto, featuring Sean Jones as soloist; “Fête dans la tête” by John Beasley; and “RPM’s” by Igmar Thomas. In addition to these commissions, among the album highlights include: “We’re Still Here” by—and featuring—trombonist and NYO Jazz faculty member Wycliffe Gordon, which has become the band’s rousing encore theme song; hence, the album’s title; “The Art of War” by Ralph Peterson; “Oyelo” by Miguel Zenón, featuring Melissa Aldana as soloist; “A Taste of Honey” by Duke Pearson; “Mr. Gentle and Mr. Cool” by Duke Ellington, arranged by NYO Jazz ensemble coach Reginald Thomas; and “Transitions” by Sean Jones.

“You close your eyes and think they’re all 20 years older than they are,” said Sean Jones, who pays it forward through his passionate leadership of NYO Jazz, carrying on the tradition of mentorship in jazz.

The album—recorded during the ensemble’s summer 2021 training residency at Purchase College, SUNY, amidst the COVID-19 pandemic—is a declaration of resilience and longevity. A summer that began with the disappointment of a year without touring evolved into the opportunity to create this 97-minute showcase of the incredible artistry and enormous versatility of this remarkable ensemble, a recording poised to reach audiences around the world just as the ensemble resumes touring in summer 2022.

“We’re thrilled for NYO Jazz to release its debut album this spring—the first recording by any of our national youth ensembles,” said Sarah Johnson, Chief Education Officer and Director of Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute. “It’s a tremendous opportunity for these gifted young players to train, perform, and now record alongside some of today’s leading jazz artists including special guest Melissa Aldana. It was especially meaningful for the musicians to gather for an extended residency last summer as it marked the first time many of them had the opportunity to come together to play in a full ensemble since the start of the pandemic. With We’re Still Here, we are proud to showcase the incredible depth of talent and high level of musicianship of these standout jazz musicians from across the country who will help ensure one of America’s quintessential art forms is preserved for generations to come.”

“The big band has always been America’s orchestral format and one of the most wide-ranging ensembles ever devised,” said Sean Jones, NYO Jazz’s Artistic Director, and Bandleader. “It can convey nearly any style of music in a sonically stimulating and interactive way. This recording exhibits that diversity by placing classics by Duke Ellington and Neil Hefti alongside pieces that utilize the big band as a vehicle for contemporary American music and represent a wide variety of genres.”

“Making this album was an absolute labor of love for the musicians, our incredible faculty and guest artists, and everyone involved,” said Joanna Massey, Director of Learning & Engagement Programs for Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute, who has worked with the NYO Jazz program since its inception. “From their individual preparation prior to coming together as an ensemble, through long days of rehearsals and then recording sessions, the musicians were unwavering and inspiring in their dedication to producing something meaningful for the world to hear. It’s particularly special that by recording all of the original music written especially for NYO Jazz, the album also pays tribute to the outstanding musicians from previous NYO Jazz ensembles—who, like the players heard here, embodies the future of jazz.” ~DL Media

About NYO Jazz:

Each summer, NYO Jazz, led by artistic director Sean Jones, shines a spotlight on the depth of talent found among teen jazz players across the United States. The program offers talented young musicians, ages 16-19, the opportunity to perform as cultural ambassadors for their country, sharing a uniquely American musical genre with people around the world through an international tour. The members of NYO Jazz have been recognized by Carnegie Hall as being among the finest jazz musicians in the country, following a rigorous and highly competitive audition process. After its Carnegie Hall debut in 2018, the ensemble embarked on its first-ever international tour for performances with vocalist Dianne Reeves at prestigious concert halls and music festivals in London, Amsterdam, Edinburgh, Kassel, and Berlin. In summer 2019, NYO Jazz made its debut tour to Asia, joined by vocalist Kurt Elling, including performances in Taichung, Beijing, Shanghai, Zhuhai, and Hong Kong. As part of their travel schedule, NYO Jazz musicians also have opportunities to meet and collaborate with young local musicians and experience the richness of different cultures and music.

NYO Jazz builds on the success of the acclaimed National Youth Orchestra of the United States of America (NYO-USA) and its sister ensemble for younger musicians NYO2—programs created by Carnegie Hall in 2013 and 2016, respectively—to bring together the finest young classical musicians from across the country each summer for training, performances and international touring. Each of these prestigious national programs—free to all participants—is dedicated to the proposition that talented young musicians thrive when they have the opportunity to expand their musical, social, and cultural horizons and share their artistry with audiences around the globe. Since 2013, Carnegie Hall’s national youth ensembles have performed in 15 countries on four continents, including tours to China, South Korea, Mexico, Ecuador, Colombia, Russia, and across Europe.

Carnegie Hall’s NYO Jazz · We’re Still Here
Release Date: June 24, 2022

For more information on NYO Jazz, please visit:

‘Agua de Jamaica’ is the first collaborative project between producer, multi-instrumentalist, composer, and arranger Sylvester Uzoma Onyejiaka II AKA Sly5thAve and pianist and composer Roberto Verástegui.

Agua de Jamaica’ is the first collaborative project between producer, multi-instrumentalist, composer, and arranger Sylvester Uzoma Onyejiaka II AKA Sly5thAve and pianist and composer Roberto Verástegui. The pair originally met whilst studying Jazz in Texas and began piecing together the release on Sly5thAve’s first visit to Mexico, over a drink of Agua de Jamaica – a drink made with water, hibiscus flower, and sugar. Recorded during the lockdown in Mexico, the LP is built from a passionate and comprehensive understanding of Jazz, a love of Hip Hop, and Mexico City’s ever-vibrant artistic culture, Latin flavors, and the African roots from which these sounds grew.

Epitomizing this fusion of sounds and collaborative talents on the introductory single “Tie Break”, Sly5thAve reworks a track originally written as a big band chart for the Orquesta Nacional de Jazz de Mexico by Roberto. Beginning with the original lead sheet, laced with nods to Funk and Hip Hop, the pair improvised a Jazz reworking before taking it home to layer synths, piano, and beats. With a constant backbeat and harmonic pattern courtesy of Sly5thAve, Roberto’s Hammond organ takes the experimental Jazz center stage.

At the heart of ‘Agua de Jamaica’ is the title track; the moment Sly5thAve and Roberto realized they had something to pursue. Thought of by both Sly5thAve and Roberto as the fullest collaboration on the release, “Agua de Jamaica” considers the constant artistic and cultural exchange between the US and Mexico, despite the political differences. It draws the listener in with a Hip Hop loop intertwined with hypnotic vocals from local artist Silvana Estrada; “she has a voice, unlike anything I’ve ever heard. She has the ability to effortlessly float between genres”, Sly5thAve adds.

Having moved to Mexico City at the beginning of 2020, Sly5thAve stayed with Roberto and his wife Yuki during the first Covid-19 lockdown; outtakes of their time together BBQing can be heard on the serendipitous “Empeño (lil’ bop)” if you listen closely. This time allowed for the pair to build on their ideas and explorations of different sounds and places centered around Jazz. Their combined voice, emotions, and way of working are perfectly presented in the Afrobeat-inspired “La Tormenta”. “I stayed up all night working it out and it came together last minute,” Sly5thAve recalls. “After we had finished recording everything we went back in and started to piece it all together like a Hip Hop record. Thinking about how it all came together, “La Tormenta” (or “The Thunderstorm” in English) made the most sense”. This energy carries through to the interweaving melodies of the Modern Jazz-inspired “The Wanderer” – built from unused demos of a Jazz album Sly5thAve had been working on – and onto the improvised big, tough city vibes of “Past Thoughts”. “We decided to improvise over some Jazz changes that get played pretty often, but with an ‘IN YOUR FACE’ edge”, Roberto says, highlighting the freely played nature of the Jazz tune which peaks with the perfected communication between the rhythm section and Sly5thAve’s sax sound. ~Bandcamp

Released: March 25, 2022

[ALBUM REVIEW]… inspiring bassist-composer Mark Wade’s fourth album True Stories

Several years ago, I had an unexpected pleasure to meet and explore a recording titled “Event Horizon,” to my delight this album was thoughtfully curated by an evolving young bassist and composer named Mark Wade. Of course, Wade has since meticulously labored through the layers of three lyrically enticing recordings “Moving Day, Songs From Isolation” with noted musicality, and focused tonality anchored to his major influences surges with precision.

With the arrival of  “TRUE STORIES,” his fourth album features the talented Tim Harrison and Scott Neumann to establish Wade’s most fertile work to date. Moreover, fear not his loyal fanbase won’t be surprised but ecstatic to hear Mark’s flawless voice, warmth, and elasticity armed with significant growth documented through this fruitful collection of eight originals and one cover tune for good measure.

From the outset, the Miles Davis-inspired “I FEEL MORE LIKE I DO NOW” lives up to expectation as he channels his way note by note through the body of metered melodies, embraceable rhythms, and poignant harmonics are inviting and pleasing to the ear. “FALLING DELORES” appears next, this lovely gem my favorite sways with spirited lyricism, while clothed with Wayne Shorter’s immersive voicings is shaped by Wade’s coalesced tone on this attractive composition.

In recent memory I’ve grown fond of the velocity, warmth, and ambiance of the acoustic bass, Mark Wade is among many who has encouraged and developed my ongoing appreciation through tunes like “THE SOLDIER AND THE FIDDLE” inspired by virtuoso Igor Stravinsky embellishes the lingering and delectable tonality intertwined I yearn to hear jazz wise. The next tune, “IN THE MARKET” literally caught me off guard originally recorded by the iconic fusion ensemble Weather Report, Wade’s intuitive voice is apparent and virtuosity articulates his reimaged vision with ample twists and layers is a near-perfect addition to this collection.

At the fifth position, the bluesy swag of “PISCATWAY WENT THAT-A-WAY” to capture my attention encompasses the talents co-written by the incomparable duo Wade and pianist Fred Hersch. Combining their insightful approach is an example of why jazz enthusiasts love and appreciate this genre and continue to be sustained by remnants of what jazz embellishes historically has embodied and expands and perfects its colorful voicings in real-time.

With three songs in the balance from a listener’s perspective, I wonder which way will this journey take me?  The tangible “SIMPLE SONG” in the lineup accentuates Mark’s viable yet embolden tonality with a spark of enthusiasm provided by pianist Frank Kimbrough together materialized by their passion and unity as collaborators student and teacher. Cemented in the nuances of Wade’s musical vocabulary echoes hints of Charles Mingus penned in the context, architecture, and savoring swing of “SONG WITH ORANGE & OTHER THINGS.” Closing this session, Mark Wade’s signature is deeply inscribed in the delightful passages adorned with unmatched interplay applied on “AT THE SUNSIDE,” much like his previous pieces this gem paints his musical persona with a vivid array of gracious accents usher listeners into the wealth of this varied musical collective.

Even though I don’t consider myself an authority on jazz, nonetheless, novice and enthusiasts alike are likely to agree with each listen will recognize the substance, maturity, and ascension of bassist-composer Mark Wade’s rousing voice is vaulted into the future with excellence on his latest and stellar contribution to the world of jazz titled “TRUE STORIES.”

~Reviewed by Rob Young of AJE

 

 

Vibraphonist Joel Ross is back with his 3rd album, an expansive album-length suite titled “The Parable of the Poet” which comes out April 15!

Vibraphonist and composer Joel Ross returns with stunning conviction on The Parable of the Poet, an expansive album-length suite composed by Ross which marks his 3rd release for Blue Note following his 2019 debut KingMaker and 2020’s Who Are You?The Parable of the Poet will be released April 15 on vinyl, CD, and digital formats, and is introduced today with the sublime opening movement “PRAYER” which is available to stream or download now.

Steadfast in his commitment to skewing perceptions of improvisation and written composition, Ross explores new territory with his 8-piece Parables band, bringing together young artists of sharply defined expression: Blue Note labelmate Immanuel Wilkins on alto saxophone, Maria Grand on tenor saxophone, Marquis Hill on trumpetKalia Vandever on trombone, Sean Mason on piano, Rick Rosato on bass, Craig Weinrib on drums, and special guest Gabrielle Garo on flute.

The album embodies Ross’ collaborative spirit. His lyrical aesthetic activates an ebb and flows from one movement to the next. Moments of intentional discourse drive sections of collective melody and spontaneous counterpoint. “This band is more than just the instruments,” says the Chicago-born, New York City-based artist. “Every person on here means something to me. They’re all my friends. Everybody involved committed themselves to the vision.”

Ross’ vision for the music is at once explicit and mysterious. He seeks to express themes present in parable tellings and retellings while leaving each story’s particulars open to interpretation. Each title of the 7-movement suite references an emotional decision or experience for Ross. But in the studio he focused on fresh interpretations, allowing his past experiences to exist without dictating the band’s present treatment of the music. “I told them, ‘This is what the music is and this is how I want you to approach it — let everything we play be inspired by the melody.’ Not much else was decided,” says Ross, who enjoys “blurring the lines between melody and improvisation,” in part, as a way to facilitate communication and meaningful musical discourse.

Obscuring divisions between scripted and spontaneous is more than a romantic notion. For Ross, it’s truthful and intrinsic. Each composition he explores on The Parable of the Poet represents a near intact improvisation, some dating back to 2017, all of which emerged during creative sessions with his friend and colleague, saxophonist Sergio Tabanico. “We would record it, then I would go back and flesh out the composition,” he says. “I tried my best not to change any harmonic information or add too much more than what was already there. I just tried to organize the information in a manner that would yield sensible improvised group interaction, while giving enough direction.”

That choice prompts striking moments of deep listening and self-orchestrating among Ross and his fellow artists. The first movement “PRAYER” sets a tone of rumination and collective inquiry. Apart from Ross’ tender solo introduction, the piece exercises restraint. “There’s no one person who’s taking the mic,” says Ross. “Everyone has a moment of playing the theme,” kindling shared navigation and discourse. ~BlueNoteReocords

At your leisure, check out “PRAYER” from the forthcoming album “THE PARABLE OF THE POET” by Joel Ross

Mark Wade’s True Stories is a modern jazz compendium inspired by a lifetime of listening – a leap forward fueled by looking back

Modern jazz composer and bassist Mark Wade is open to appreciating and co-creating great music in all its forms, and clearly not limited by genre. True Stories, his fourth album, shows the breadth of his musicality and inventive compositional style. Eight original tracks (and one cover) were inspired by a wide range of influences, drawing on themes from composers such as Miles Davis, Charles Mingus, and Igor Stravinsky. The result is a unique expression of jazz linking past to present.

Wade’s critical success has led to him being named one of the top bassists of the year for five of the last six years in the Downbeat Magazine Reader’s Poll. He received international acclaim for his trio with the 2015 recording Event Horizon on Edition 46 Records and the 2018 follow-up Moving Day on AMP Music & Records. In 2020 he launched a unique solo project – a visual album. Debuted online from the Centre for Jazz and Popular Music in Durban, South Africa, Songs from Isolation was released worldwide on AMP Music & Records. It features acoustic and electric bass and the plethora of sounds those instruments can create. The tunes are accompanied by music videos created by the bassist. (His camera and editing skills had blossomed during New York City’s COVID-19 lockdown.)

That sonic and technological exploration was a fascinating prelude to his next project. True Stories is a modern jazz compendium inspired by a lifetime of listening – a leap forward fueled by looking back. The album features long-time Mark Wade Trio pianist Tim Harrison and drummer Scott Neumann. It is released in 2022 by Amp Music & Records and is available from fine retailers everywhere.

Michigan-born, Wade moved to New Jersey as a child. He began his musical journey by teaching himself to play electric bass at age 14. At New York University, renowned bassist Mike Richmond encouraged him to take up acoustic bass for jazz and to hone bow technique and sight-reading abilities. That also enabled him to play European classical music. In 1997 he earned a B.A. in music with a concentration in jazz.

Remaining in NYC, Wade has since performed at Jazz at Lincoln Center, The Blue Note, The Iridium, and Birdland. He is a former artist in residence at Flushing Town Hall and tours in North America and Europe. He has played with jazz notables James Spaulding, Eddie Palmieri, Conrad Herwig, Harry Whitaker, Stacey Kent, Peter Eldridge, Don Byron, and Jimmy Heath, and is a member of the Pete McGuinness Jazz Orchestra. On the classical side, he has appeared with the Key West Symphony, Orchestra of the S.E.M./Janacek Philharmonic (Czech Republic) at Lincoln Center and Carnegie Hall, and performed with the Orchestra of the Bronx and Bronx Opera.
Wade directs New Music Horizons, which promotes the work of emerging jazz and classical composers. Concert sites include the National Jazz Museum in Harlem, Flushing Town Hall, The Clemente cultural center on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, Sunnyside Community Services in Queens, and Art House Astoria. He also serves as artistic director for Art in the Park and the Annapolis Jazz & Roots Festival in Maryland. Formerly a teaching artist with the New York Pops, he has been on the jazz faculty at Lehigh University since 2017.

Album Highlights
Track 1, “I Feel More Like I Do Now” is a modern jazz piece in multiple time signatures. Composed by Mark Wade, it was inspired by Miles Smiles, the first jazz album he ever bought. Wade aimed to capture some of the inventive spirit evident in Miles Davis’s great quintet recordings from the 60s. “Falling Delores” on Track 2 is credited to Mark Wade and Wayne Shorter. It combines two Wayne Shorter tunes with an original theme by Wade. Track 3 is “The Soldier and the Fiddle.” Although inspired by Igor Stravinsky‘s “The Soldier’s Tale,” this Wade original doesn’t take specific melodic themes from Stravinsky but borrows his technique of supplying a steady march-like rhythm in the bass while other instruments move around it shifting meters. Track 4, In The Market,” is a Wade/Zawinul/Shorter creation – a mashup of themes from the iconic Weather Report album Black Market, especially borrowing from “Herandnu” and “Black Market.” Only at the conclusion, after many twists and turns, is the material presented in its original form. Track 5, “Piscataway Went That-a-Way,” is a quirky blues in D flat. The Mark Wade/Fred Hersch tune expands the theme from Hersch’s “Swamp Thing.” While driving, Wade passed the exit for Piscataway, N.J. when “Swamp Thing” came on the radio. He named the tune in honor of that moment.

A shift from odd meters can be found on Track 6. “A Simple Song” by Mark Wade/Frank Kimbrough is written in 4/4. The late pianist and composer Frank Kimbrough was Wade’s teacher at NYU. The tune’s sections of metered and unmetered statements were a hallmark in much of Frank’s music. Tracks 7 & 8 are “Song with Orange & Other Things – Parts 1 and 2.” The first part is a Wade original meant to sound like something Mingus would have penned. The second part (Track 8) is a tune that Mingus actually did compose entitled “Song with Orange.” Track 9, “At the Sunside,” is a Mark Wade/Mikael Godee composition. The first few notes are from “Solokvist” from the well-known Swedish jazz ensemble CORPO led by Mikael Godee. Wade shared a tour with the group in 2018 in Belgium and France and has fond memories of their time on the road.

True Stories was produced by Mark Wade and recorded at Oktaven Audio in Mount Vernon, New York, in May of 2021. It was engineered by Ryan Streber and mixed and mastered by Frank Fagnano in Ramsey, New Jersey, in June/July 2021. Liner notes are by Sammy Stein of Woodbridge, Suffolk, UK. For music and more visit http://markwademusicny.com.

Saxophonist and Composer Kenny Garrett’s Critically Acclaimed Sounds from the Ancestors Wins “Outstanding Jazz Album – Instrumental” at 53rd NAACP Image Awards

“I would like to thank The NAACP for this prestigious award.
I’m honored to be part of the pantheon of artists who have received
this special tribute and I congratulate the NAACP for the
work it does and will continue to do.” – Kenny Garrett


Kenny Garrett’s latest release, Sounds from the Ancestors, is a multi-faceted album. The music, however, doesn’t lodge inside the tight confines of the jazz idiom, which is not surprising considering the alto saxophonist and composer acknowledges the likes of Aretha Franklin and Marvin Gaye as significant touchstones. Similar to how Miles Davis’ seminal LP, On the Corner, subverted its main guiding lights – James Brown, Jimi Hendrix, and Sly Stone – then crafted its own unique, polyrhythmic, groove-laden, improv-heavy universe, Sounds from the Ancestors occupies its own space with intellectual clarity, sonic ingenuity, and emotional heft.

Sounds from the Ancestors examines the roots of West African music in the framework of jazz, gospel, Motown, hip-hop, and all other genres that have descended from jùjú and Yoruban music,” explains Garrett. “It’s crucial to acknowledge the ancestral roots in the sounds we’ve inhabited under the aesthetics of Western music.”

Indeed, Sounds from the Ancestors reflects the rich jazz, R&B, and gospel history of his hometown of Detroit. More important though, it also reverberates with a modern cosmopolitan vibrancy – notably the inclusion of music coming out of France, Cuba, Nigeria, and Guadeloupe.

“The concept initially was about trying to get some of the musical sounds that I remembered as a kid growing up – sounds that lift your spirit from people like John Coltrane, ‘A Love Supreme;’ Aretha Franklin, ‘Amazing Grace;’ Marvin Gaye, ‘What’s Going On;’ and the spiritual side of the church,” Garrett explains. “When I started to think about them, I realized it was the spirit from my ancestors.”

The core ensemble for Sounds from the Ancestors consists of musicians that Garrett has recorded and toured within the recent past – pianist Vernell Brown, Jr., bassist Corcoran Holt, drummer Ronald Bruner, and percussionist Rudy Bird. The album also features guest appearances from drummer Lenny White, pianist and organist Johnny Mercier, trumpeter Maurice Brown, conguero Pedrito Martinez, batá percussionist Dreiser Durruthy and singers Dwight Trible, Jean Baylor, Linny Smith, Chris Ashley Anthony, and Sheherazade Holman. And on a couple of cuts, Garrett extends his instrumental palette by playing piano and singing.

With his illustrious career that includes hallmark stints with Miles Davis, Art Blakey and The Jazz Messengers, Donald Byrd, Freddie Hubbard, Woody Shaw, and the Duke Ellington Orchestra, as well as a heralded career as a solo artist that began more than 30 years ago, Garrett is easily recognized as one of modern jazz’s brightest and most influential living masters. And with the marvelous Sounds from the Ancestors, the GRAMMY® Award-winning Garrett shows no signs of resting on his laurels.

Saxophonist Mark Turner Leads an Exploratory and Thought Provoking Journey in his Latest Release, Return from the Stars

The quartet features Jason Palmer,
Joe Martin, and Jonathan Pinson
Available March 25 via ECM Records
Mark Turner has been a frequent and significant presence on ECM recordings of the last dozen years, bringing his saxophone artistry and his musical commitment to recordings with Enrico Rava, the Billy Hart Quartet, the cooperative Fly trio (with Jeff Ballard and Larry Grenadier), Stefano Bollani and, most recently, Ethan Iverson, on the duo recording Temporary Kings. Albums under Turner’s leadership, however, have been rare, and Return from the Stars is the first ECM recording to feature his quartet since 2014’s Lathe of Heaven.

Turner’s writing for his group on Return from the Stars gives the players plenty of space in which to move, on an album both exhilarating and thoughtful in its arc of expression. Solos flow organically out of the arrangements and, beneath the dazzling interplay of Turner’s tenor and Jason Palmer’s trumpet, bassist Joe Martin and drummer Jonathan Pinson often roam freely. The absence of a chordal instrument keeps the conversational possibilities in the music wide open, as the compositions modulate between the meticulously structured and the loosely guided. Mark Turner puts a lot of faith in intuition and the shared artistic goals of an ensemble, and cherishes the narrative tension arising from the juxtaposition of freedom and responsibility:

My process in writing is that I write for the people playing,” he says. “I don’t like to say a lot to them about the compositions. I like to write a piece of music and know that the people I’ve chosen are going to play it, basically, the way they play. I’d rather they find themselves in the music. The tunes are written in such a way that each musician has a choice in terms of how they take care of what they’re supposed to be doing. There are parts written for the horns. Not so much is written for the rhythm section, except for a few ‘hits’ and maybe time changes in sections. I just give guidelines about how the section should feel and then I let bass and drums figure out how to do it. Whatever makes the rhythm section sound good, that’s what we do. Then, the horns will play on top of that. “

Bassist Joe Martin is the sole musician retained from the Lathe of Heaven line-up. He’s been playing with Turner in diverse contexts since 1995. And, as he outlined it to Music & Literature magazine: “I always feel, playing with Mark I have to play as well as possible and raise the bar. In the quartet, because there isn’t a piano or guitar player to fill a certain harmonic space for everybody, I’m more probably more conscious of my note choices. Just one single note choice changes everything, suggesting tonality, harmony.”

Turner met dynamic drummer Jonathan Pinson while playing with Israeli guitarist Gilad Hekselman’s group. Pinson’s CV begins at a high level: he dived into the music at the deep end, touring with Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, and Greg Osby while still in his early twenties. His résumé also includes work with Kamasi Washington, Ambrose Akinmusire, Dave Liebman, and many others. Pinson makes his ECM debut with Return from the Stars, as does trumpeter Jason Palmer.

Palmer and Mark Turner first encountered each other as sidemen in bands a decade ago. Mark subsequently played in projects led by the trumpeter, also recording in some of his projects (Places, Rhyme and Reason, and The Concert). He singles out Palmer’s “willingness to go into zones unknown to him” among his outstanding qualities. The two of them share an encyclopedic knowledge of the music. The Boston Phoenix has said of Palmer that he “builds fire with his secure tone and the cool deliberation of his solos”. The same could be said of Turner, who, according to National Public Radio, “has an innovative sonic signature, a certain floating chromaticism, rhythmic mindfulness and lightness of tone, filled with subtleties.”

Return from the Stars takes its title from Stanisław Lem’s science fiction novel in which an astronaut returns from an exploratory space mission to find life on earth greatly changed, and his own values out of step with those of a conformist, risk-averse society. Turner’s sci-fi enthusiasms are well known, and some observers have perceived a kind of idiomatic ‘time traveling’ quality in his work: The Guardian described his ECM quartet album Lathe of Heaven (named after an Ursula K. Le Guin story) as “sounding like Birth of the Cool floated over a 21st-century rhythmic concept.” A deep study of a range of jazz masters has informed his style, his expressivity on the full range of the tenor saxophone, and the scope of his writing, which brings the music forward while being acutely aware of its history.

Return from the Stars was recorded at New York’s Sear Sound Studio and mixed at Studios La Buissonne, in Southern France. The album was produced by Manfred Eicher.

Nasher Sculpture Center Announces ‘SCULPTING SOUND: Twelve Musicians Encounter Bertoia’

Unprecedented, six-night concert series brings world-renowned musicians to play Harry Bertoia’s sounding sculptures 

DALLAS, Texas (December 13, 2021)—The Nasher Sculpture Center announces ‘SCULPTING SOUND: Twelve Musicians Encounter Bertoia’, a series of six historic concerts, from February 22–27, 2022, bringing together twelve master musicians to explore the expressive range of Harry Bertoia’s sounding sculptures, in complement to the exhibition Harry Bertoia: Sculpting Mid-Century Modern Life on view at the Nasher January 29 – April 23, 2022. “‘SCULPTING SOUND’ is one of the most exciting and generous extensions to an exhibition that we have ever offered the public,” says Director Jeremy Strick. “Alongside their own instruments, this extraordinary group of musicians will bring Bertoia’s sounding sculptures into their full aural potential within the museum, unifying the disciplines of sculpture and music, as Bertoia intended. The results of this exceptional occasion will certainly astound, marking a historic moment within both fields.” Harry Bertoia created hundreds of sounding sculptures—comprised of metal rods in various metals anchored to bases, as well as gongs and “singing bars”—that could be touched, struck, and strummed to create a range of tonal sounds. Bertoia recorded eleven albums using this work, and although nearly unknown to the public at large, these records proved deeply influential in the world of leading-edge music and sound design and garnered a growing list of admirers among some of the most celebrated musicians in the world. Extending and enriching this musical legacy, ‘SCULPTING SOUND,’ conceived and curated by poet and record producer David Breskin, will pair twelve critically acclaimed, award-winning musicians over six nights, each night dedicated to a particular instrument that will be played with the Bertoia sounding sculptures. Exploring new realms of the Sonambient, the term that Bertoia coined to express the physical sensation of being immersed in the vibrations of the sounding sculptures, the concert series will include electric guitarists Nels Cline & Ben Monder, trumpeters Ambrose Akinmusire & Nate Wooley, saxophonists Ingrid Laubrock & JD AllenBrandon Seabrook & Jen Shyu on acoustic strings, drummers Marcus Gilmore & Dan Weiss, and pianists Kris Davis & Craig Taborn‘SCULPTING SOUND’ Concert Schedule7 p.m. each night at the Nasher Sculpture Center February 22: Electric Guitar Night: Nels Cline & Ben MonderFebruary 23: Trumpet Night: Ambrose Akinmusire & Nate Wooley February 24: Saxophone Night: Ingrid Laubrock & JD AllenFebruary 25: Acoustic Strings Night: Jen Shyu & Brandon Seabrook February 26: Drums / Percussion Night: Marcus Gilmore & Dan Weiss February 27: Piano Night: Kris Davis & Craig Taborn Individual tickets are $30 and ticket packages for all six nights are available for purchase here. Concerts will be recorded live.For high-resolution images, please visit this link.ABOUT THE ‘SCULPTING SOUND’ MUSICIANS February 22 | Electric Guitar Night Nels Cline | A true guitar polymath, Nels Cline’s recording and performing career spans jazz, rock, punk and experimental music with over 200 recordings, including 30 as a leader, to his credit. His many accolades include being anointed by Rolling Stone as both one of 20 New Guitar Gods and one of the top 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time. Cline’s first recording was Elegies with composer Eric Von Essen, who played duets with Cline. There followed a series of recordings with New York avant-garde alto saxophonist Tim Berne and with Berne’s mentor Julius Hemphill before Cline hit a prolific streak in the ‘90s with a string of releases by the Nels Cline Trio. The guitarist’s 1999 release,Interstellar Space Revisited (The Music of John Coltrane), was an explosive duet with drummer Gregg Bendian. He followed with a string of eight uncompromising releases through the 2000s for the Cryptogramophone label, including 2002’s debut by the Nels Cline Singers, Instrumentals, and their 2004 follow-up, The Giant Pin, that put him on the avant- garde map. Cline’s profile was elevated to a whole other level after joining Wilco in 2004. For his ambitious 2016 Blue Note debut, Lovers, Nels defied all expectations by delivering a sumptuous chamber- orchestra feast of mood music that was an unapologetically romantic paean to the Great American Songbook. For his 2018 follow-up on Blue Note, Currents, Constellations, he pared it down to a quartet, dubbed The Nels Cline 4, and showcased a tight two-guitar interplay with his six- string partner Julian. His 2016 double album debut on Blue Note, Lovers, was called “quietly ravishing” by The New York Times, while his 2018 follow-up, Currents, Constellations, was called “vibrant, adventurous” by StereogumBen Monder | Ben Monder has performed with a wide variety of artists, including Jack McDuff, Marc Johnson, Lee Konitz, Billy Childs, Andrew Cyrille, Paul Motian, Maria Schneider, Louis Cole, Marshall Crenshaw and Jandek. He also contributed guitar parts to the last David Bowie album, Blackstar. He is a current member of the celebrated group The Bad Plus and continues to perform original music internationally in both solo and trio settings. Ben has appeared on over 200 CDs as a sideman and has released seven as a leader: Day After Day (Sunnyside, 2019) Amorphae (ECM, 2015), Hydra (Sunnyside, 2013), Oceana (Sunnyside, 2005), Excavation (Arabesque, 2000), Dust (Arabesque, 1997), and Flux (Songlines, 1995). February 23 | Trumpet Night Ambrose Akinmusire | Described by NPR Music as “one of the most acclaimed jazz artists of his generation, a trumpeter of deep expressive resources and a composer of kaleidoscopic vision,” Ambrose Akinmusire has made a home at the crossroads of different musical forms and languages, from post-bop and avant-garde jazz to contemporary chamber music and hip-hop to singer-songwriter aesthetics. His 2018 release Origami Harvest features rapper Kool A.D. with the Mivos String Quartet and was named a top album of 2018 by The New York TimesThe Philadelphia InquirerThe Los Angeles Times and more. In addition to winning the prestigious Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition in 2007 and the Carmine Caruso International Jazz Trumpet Solo Competition the same year, Akinmusire has frequently topped the JazzTimes and Downbeat annual critics polls. He has received the Doris Duke Performing Artist Award (2014); Le Grand Prix de l’Académie du Jazz (2014); Germany’s ECHO Jazz Award (Instrumentalist of the Year/Brass); and The Netherlands’ Paul Acket Award. Nate Wooley | Nate Wooley is considered one of the leading lights of the American movement, redefining the physical boundaries of the horn, and has gathered international acclaim for his idiosyncratic trumpet language. Since moving to New York in 2001, he has become one of the most in-demand trumpet players in the burgeoning Brooklyn jazz, improv, noise, and new music scenes. He has performed regularly with John Zorn, Anthony Braxton, Eliane Radigue, Annea Lockwood, Ken Vandermark, Evan Parker, and Yoshi Wada. He has premiered works for trumpet by Christian Wolff, Michael Pisaro, Annea Lockwood, Ash Fure, Wadada Leo Smith, Sarah Hennies and Eva-Maria Houben. In recent years, he has built a reputation as a composer of music epic in scope and social in design. His series of solo works based on the International Phonetic Alphabet, The Complete Syllables Music, was compared to the literary work of Georges Perec and hailed as “revolutionary solo repertoire” by All About JazzFebruary 24 | Saxophone NightJD Allen | Hailed by the New York Times as “a tenor saxophonist with an enigmatic, elegant and hard-driving style,” JD Allen is a bright light on today’s international jazz scene, with 14 albums as a leader to his credit. His unique and compelling voice on the instrument has earned Allen years of critical attention signaling his ascension to the upper ranks of the contemporary jazz world. Originally from Detroit, Allen’s apprenticeship, anchored by his lengthy tenure with Betty Carter, occurred largely in New York, where he worked with legends Lester Bowie, George Cables, Ron Carter, Louis Hayes, Frank Foster Big Band, Winard Harper, Dave Douglas, Butch Morris, David Murray, Wallace Roney, Rufus Reid and Geri Allen. Allen’s last trio album, Toys / Die Dreaming, extends his singular and well-honed approach to the trio. His solo saxophone debut, Queen City was released to great critical acclaim and a standout offering that took the listener directly into Allen’s world of isolation during the Covid-19 lockdown. Off the bandstand, Allen is a compelling educator and activist. He is a founder of We Insist!, a nonprofit jazz and Black arts action community and co-founder along with Nasheet Waits and Eric Revis of We Insist! sister organization We up – Re up, a collective of jazz musicians whose primary goal is to foster jazz performance curating opportunities within non-traditional inner city and rural performance settings.Ingrid Laubrock is a prolific composer and was named a “true visionary” by pianist and The Kennedy Center’s artistic director Jason Moran, and a “fully committed saxophonist and visionary” by The New Yorker. Laubrock has performed with Anthony Braxton, Muhal Richard Abrams, Jason Moran, Kris Davis, Nels Cline, Tyshawn Sorey, Mary Halvorson, Zeena Parkins, Tom Rainey, Tim Berne, Dave Douglas, Wet Ink and many others. She has composed for ensembles ranging from solo to chamber orchestra. Awards include Fellowship in Jazz Composition by the Arts Foundation, BBC Jazz Prize for Innovation, SWR German Radio Jazz Prize and German Record Critics Quarterly Award. She won best Rising Star Soprano Saxophonist in the Downbeat Annual Critics Poll in 2015 and best Tenor Saxophonist in 2018. Ingrid Laubrock has received composing commissions by BBC Glasgow Symphony orchestra, Bang on The Can, Grossman Ensemble, The Shifting Foundation, The Robert D. Bielecki Foundation, The Jerwood Foundation, American Composers Orchestra, Tricentric Foundation, SWR New Jazz Meeting, The Jazz Gallery Commissioning Series, NYSCA, Wet Ink, John Zorn’s Stone Commissioning Series and the EOS Orchestra. She is a recipient of the 2019 Herb Alpert Ragdale Prize in Music Composition and the 2021 Berklee Institute of Gender Justice Women Composers Collection Grant. February 25 | Acoustic Strings Night Brandon Seabrook | Brandon Seabrook is a guitarist, banjoist, and composer living in New York City where he has established himself as one of the most potent musicians of his generation. He has released seven albums as a leader covering everything from pulverizing art-metal to chamber music, bridging the realms of extreme rock and the classical avant-garde. He has been called upon by Anthony Braxton, Cécile McLorin Salvant, Ben Allison, Gerald Cleaver, So Percussion, Frank London, Bill Laswell, Ingrid Laubrock, and Joey Arias for his idiosyncratic physical performance style, hyperreal technique, and impeccable articulation. He has been profiled in The New York TimesThe Wall Street JournalPremier GuitarDownbeat MagazineRolling Stone, NPR, The Chicago Reader, and The Wire. Brandon is an accomplished solo artist, named Best Guitarist in New York City by The Village Voice 2012. In 2014, New Atlantis Records released his first solo album titled Sylphid Vitalizers. Brandon has presented his solo work at Pioneer Works, Sonic Transmissions Festival, Secret Project Robot, NK Berlin, Lima Jazz Festival, Dither Extravaganza, The Smell, and Laurence University. Jen Shyu | Guggenheim Fellow, USA Fellow, Doris Duke Artist, multilingual vocalist-composer-multi-instrumentalist-dancer Jen Shyu is “one of the most creative vocalists in contemporary improvised music” (The Nation). Born in Peoria, Illinois to Taiwanese and East Timorese immigrants and having produced eight albums, Shyu has performed at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, Metropolitan Museum of Art, National Theater of Korea, Salihara Theater, Rubin Museum and other venues and festivals around the world and is a Fulbright scholar speaking 10 languages. She has performed with Nicole Mitchell, Kris Davis, Val Jeanty, Wadada Leo Smith, Vijay Iyer, Chris Potter, among many others, and sang in two operas of Anthony Braxton (Trillium E and Trillium J). Her album Song of Silver Geese was among The New York Times’ Best Albums of 2017 and her recent album Zero Grasses: Ritual for the Losses has received rave reviews by Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Grammys.com, and more. She’s currently touring her solo theatrical work Zero Grasses (commissioned by John Zorn) nationally and internationally. During the pandemic, she launched her Patreon page and co- founded Mutual Mentorship for Musicians with Sara Serpa. She is also a Paul Simon Music Fellows Guest Artist and a Steinway Artist. February 26 | Drums / Percussion Night Marcus Gilmore | Marcus Gilmore is a multi-Grammy Award-winning drummer/composer. While Marcus has frequently been seen performing and recording with a diverse array of the finest musicians in the world such as Chick Corea, Pharoah Sanders, Savion Glover & Pat Metheny, he has also demonstrated his multifaceted musical talents and personality through long-term solo projects with his own groups Actions Speak and Silouhwav. In 2020, he performed his first orchestral composition titled “Pulse” with members of the Cape Town Philharmonic and the 22nd Poet Laureate Tracy K Smith as part of the 2018 – 2019Annual Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative. He is also on the cusp of releasing his first solo recording. He has performed/recorded extensively with Robert Glasper, Herbie Hancock, Mulatu Astatke, Ravi Coltrane, Roscoe Mitchell, Common, Thundercat, Vijay Iyer, Wadada Leo Smith, Flying Lotus, Cassandra Wilson, Bilal, Talib Kweli, Queen Latifah, Black Thought, Zakir Hussain, Esperanza Spalding, Roy Hargrove, Nicholas Payton, and Taylor Mcferrin. Dan Weiss | Two-time Shifting Foundation Grantee Dan Weiss has been hailed as one of the top five jazz drummers by The New York Times and his large ensemble recording “Fourteen” made their top ten list of the best records of 2014. Weiss has been studying tabla under Samir Chatterjee for 25 years. He’s performed classical Indian music with the legendary Ashish Khan and Ramesh Misra, and recorded the tabla solo cd, “3dcd” (2007). Weiss also recorded two unprecedented CDs, “Teental Drumset Solo” (2005) and “Jhaptal Drumset Solo” (2011) where he performs classical Indian repertoire on drum set. With his trio, which includes Jacob Sacks and Thomas Morgan, he’s released three records which have been critically acclaimed for their unique approach to song structure and endless creative improvisation. Weiss also leads a unique 16-piece ensemble that features some of NYC’s most gifted musicians. The two albums Fourteen (2014) and Sixteen: Drummers Suite (2016) released on the Pi record label have made numerous critic polls. Weiss is currently working on a new trio project (new album in 2022) and a duo project with Miles Okazaki (double vinyl release scheduled for late 2021). February 27: Piano Night Kris Davis | Kris Davis is a critically acclaimed pianist and composer who was described by The New York Times as a beacon for “deciding where to hear jazz on a given night.” Since 2003, Davis has released 23 recordings as a leader or co-leader and has collaborated with artists such as Terri Lyne Carrington, John Zorn, Craig Taborn, Ingrid Laubrock, Tyshawn Sorey, Eric Revis, Johnathan Blake, Stephan Crump, and Eric McPherson, among others. In 2019, her album Diatom Ribbons was named jazz album of the year by both The New York Times and the NPR Music Jazz Critics Poll. She was also named 2020 Pianist of the Year, 2017 Rising Star Pianist and 2018 Rising Star Artist by DownBeat, and 2020 Pianist and Composer of the Year by the Jazz Journalists Association. Davis was named a 2021 Doris Duke Artist along with Wayne Shorter and Danilo Perez, and she has also received multiple commissions for composing new works from The Shifting Foundation, The Jazz Gallery and the Canada Council for the Arts. Craig Taborn | Born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Craig Taborn has been performing piano and electronic music in the jazz, improvisational, and creative music scene for more than 25 years. He has experience composing for and performing in a wide variety of situations including jazz, new music, electronic, rock, noise and Avant Garde contexts. Taborn has played and recorded with many luminaries in the fields of jazz, improvised, new music and electronic music including Roscoe Mitchell, Wadada Leo Smith, Lester Bowie, Dave Holland, Tim Berne, John Zorn, Evan Parker, Steve Coleman, David Torn, Chris Potter, William Parker, Vijay Iyer, Kris Davis, Nicole Mitchell, Susie Ibarra, Ikue Mori, Carl Craig, Dave Douglas, Meat Beat Manifesto, Dan Weiss, Chris Lightcap, Gerald Cleaver, and Rudresh Manhathappa. Taborn is currently occupied creating and performing music for solo piano performance (Avenging Angel), piano trio (Craig Taborn Trio), an electronic project (Junk Magic), the Daylight Ghosts Quartet, a piano/drums/electronics duo with Dave King (Heroic Enthusiasts) and a new trio with Tomeka Reid and Ches Smith as well as piano duo collaborations with Vijay Iyer (The Transitory Poems), Kris Davis (Octopus) and Cory Smythe. He is also a member of the instrumental electronic art-pop group Golden Valley is Now and performs frequently on solo electronics.‘SCULPTING SOUND: Twelve Musicians Encounter Bertoia’ is organized by David Breskin and made possible by leading support from The Shifting Foundation. Additional support for film documentation is provided by Allen and Kelli Questrom. Harry Bertoia: Sculpting Mid-Century Modern Life is made possible by leading support from the Texas Commission on the Arts and Nancy A. Nasher and David J. Haemisegger. Generous support is provided in part by the National Endowment for the Arts and Dallas Tourism Public Improvement District (DTPID). Additional support is provided by Humanities Texas. About the Nasher Sculpture Center | Located in the heart of the Dallas Arts District, the Nasher Sculpture Center is home to the Raymond and Patsy Nasher Collection, one of the finest collections of modern and contemporary sculpture in the world, featuring more than 300 masterpieces by Calder, de Kooning, di Suvero, Giacometti, Gormley, Hepworth, Kelly, Matisse, Miró, Moore, Picasso, Rodin, Serra, and Shapiro, among others. The Nasher Sculpture Center is open Wednesday to Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $10 for adults, $7 for seniors, $5 for students, and free for children 12 and under and members, and includes access to special exhibitions. Visitors must book a timed ticket in advance. For more information, visit www.NasherSculptureCenter.org.

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